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Thursday, January 15, 2009

Cookie Crumbs: The Best Leftovers!

Ever since I was a child, my dream job was to make people happy. And today I remembered why I have always loved cooking and baking in the first place. I made Eggless Cornless (yes cornless) Wheatless Oatmeal Cookies for our homeschool preschool group. John, a 3 1/2 year old, asked in earnest, "Are the mommies going to eat some?" After a minute or two, he continued, "If not, I'll have the last two!" Needless to say, I only had cookie crumbs to bring back home.

So here's the almost 'healthy' eggless, cornless, wheatless, unrefined sugar recipe adapted from my King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion:

Cream together:
4 oz unsalted butter
2 T safflower oil
1 c sucanat

Mix together in a small bowl:
1 tsp baking powder (Featherweight brand is one of the baking powders out there WITHOUT cornstarch or make your own*), 1 1/2 tbsp safflower oil and 1 1/2 tbsp water (this is my substitute for 1 egg)

Add this mixture into the butter and beat till fluffy. Then add:
6 tbsp yoghurt
2 tsp vanilla extract

Add:
2 c rolled oats

Mix together in another bowl:
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 c spelt flour

Add the flour mixture 1 c at a time to the oat mixture until well mixed. Let dough rest for 15 - 30 minutes. Drop onto greased baking sheets by the tablespoonful and bake at 350F for 12 minutes until light brown.

Make your own baking powder: Substitutes (for 1 teaspoon of baking powder): Combine 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar plus 1/4 teaspoon baking soda OR Combine two parts cream of tartar plus one part baking soda plus one part cornstarch (instead I use tapioca starch) OR Add ¼ teaspoon baking soda to dry ingredients and ½ cup buttermilk or yogurt or sour milk to wet ingredients. Decrease another liquid in the recipe by ½ cup. OR Add ¼ teaspoon baking soda to dry ingredients and ¼ cup molasses to wet ingredients. Decrease another liquid in the recipe by 2 tablespoons. OR 1 teaspoon baker’s ammonia (This yields a very light, airy product, but can impart an ammonia flavor to baked goods. It's best used in cookies, which are flat enough to allow the ammonia odor to dissipate during cooking.)

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